Jd salingers catcher in the rye holdens phony phobia

As a teenager, he mostly distrusts adults for being phony. For example, in chapter three, Holden describes a Pencey alumnus and wealthy mortician, named Ossenburger, as phony when he gives a speech to the students as follows:

Jd salingers catcher in the rye holdens phony phobia

The novel is a frame story a story within a certain fictional framework in the form of a long flashback. Holden wants to tell what happened over a two-day period the previous December, beginning on the Saturday afternoon of the traditional season-ending football game between his school, Pencey Prep, and Saxon Hall.

He is out of shape because he smokes too much. His general health is poor. He is alternately depressed, confused, angry, anxious, perceptive, bigoted, resentful, thoughtful, kind, and horny. To put it simply, Holden is struggling. To Holden, Pencey and the other prep schools that he has attended represent all that is artificial "phony" is one of Holden's favorite words to describe this artificiality and all that is despicable about any institution controlled by adults.

Holden Caulfield of Catcher In the Rye, the equivalent portrayal of J.D Salinger Jerome David “J.D” Salinger’s masterpiece, The Catcher in the Rye, is a world to the disillusioned protagonist Holden . In the autumn of , at his home in Westport, Connecticut, J. D. Salinger completed The Catcher in the Rye. The achievement was a catharsis. The major conflict is within Holden's psyche. Part of him wants to connect with other people on an adult level (and, more specifically, to have a sexual encounter), while part of him wants to reject the adult world as "phony," and to retreat into his own memories of childhood.

The schools are filled with lies and cruelty, ranging in degree from the relatively harmless Pencey school motto "Since we have been molding boys into splendid, clear-thinking young men. Holden resents the adult world and resists entry into it, but he has little choice.

Society and his own body are telling him that it is time for him to change. He is attracted to the trappings of adulthood: But he despises the compromises, loss of innocence, absence of integrity, and loss of authenticity in the grown-up world.

He seems best at the rites of passage smoking and drinking that are themselves artificial if not self-destructive.

Despite his limited experience, his attitude toward women is actually admirable and mature. He stops making sexual advances when a girl says "No. In his confusion, he sees this behavior as a weakness that may even call for psychotherapy. His interactions with the prostitute Sunny are comic as well as touching, partly because they are both adolescents trying to be adults.

Although Sunny is the more frightening of the two, neither belongs there. Holden is literally about to crash. Near the beginning as well as the end of the novel, he feels that he will disappear or fall into an abyss when he steps off a curb to cross a street.

Sometimes when this happens, he calls on his dead brother, Alliefor help. Part of Holden's collapse is due to his inability to come to terms with death.

Thoughts of Allie lying in his grave in the cemetery in the rain, surrounded by dead bodies and tombstones, haunt Holden. He wants time itself to stop.

Related Questions Phoniness is the key theme illustrated in the controversial author J. Through his journey Holden often describes people and situations he comes in contact with as phony.
J. D. Salinger Phoniness is the key theme illustrated in the controversial author J.
Get Full Essay Holden, in his narration, relates a flashback of a significant period of his life, three days and nights on his own in New York City. Through his narration, Holden discloses to the reader his innermost thoughts and feelings.
The Catcher in the Rye Holden - srmvision.com One of the biggest reasons I left Elkton Hills was because I was surrounded by phonies. They were coming in the goddam window.

He wants beautiful moments to last forever, using as his model the displays in glass at the Museum of Natural History, in which the same people are shown doing the same things year after year.

Never mind that even museum displays change. Holden's fears and desires are understandable, but his solution avoiding reality is impossible. His feelings are typically adolescent, feelings shared by virtually everyone who is or ever has been his age. One of the reasons we like Holden is that he is so candid about how he feels.Catcher in The Rye.

CIR Writing Prompt: Phoniness is the key theme illustrated in the controversial author J. D. Salinger‘s Catcher in the Rye. This novel depicts the main character Holden Caulfield’s experiences just after getting kicked out of the prestigious Pency Academy.

Holden is a virgin, but he is very interested in sex, and, in fact, he spends much of the novel trying to lose his virginity. He feels strongly that sex should happen between people who care deeply about and respect one another, and he is upset by the realization that sex can be casual.

The Catcher in the Rye: Holden Caulfield's Coming of Age Story Words | 10 Pages J. D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, Salinger’s main character Holden Caulfield matures throughout the course of the novel.

The Catcher in the Rye Essay Sample. Does the character of Allie significantly change Holden?

Jd salingers catcher in the rye holdens phony phobia

In The Catcher in the Rye J.D. Salinger introduces Holden Caulfield, an innocent spirit surrounded by the ugly and harsh realities of the world around him. Phony is one of the words in the English literature that can have numerous interpretations.

Can be being phony possibly hinder an attempt to accomplish a task to fully function mentally? Can phony delay an individuals maturing period? In J.D. Salinger's Catcher in the Rye, Holden's "phony phobia" restricts him from becoming a fully matured adult. Holden Caulfield of Catcher In the Rye, the equivalent portrayal of J.D Salinger Jerome David “J.D” Salinger’s masterpiece, The Catcher in the Rye, is a world to the disillusioned protagonist Holden .

What is the theme of Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye? | eNotes